Chimpanzees In Kyambura Gorge In Queen Elizabeth National Park

Chimpanzees in Kyambura gorge are the members of the great apes family along with humans, gorillas including mountain gorillas available in Uganda and orangutans.

Chimpanzees In Kyambura Gorge In Queen Elizabeth National Park

Chimpanzees in Kyambura gorge are the members of the great apes family along with humans, gorillas including mountain gorillas available in Uganda and orangutans. You can easily say that they are apes rather than monkeys because they lack that long-tail possessed by monkeys.

The chimpanzees in Kyambura gorge share more than 98% of the human genetic blueprint making them the closest relatives of humans genetically. This is one of the interesting chimpanzees that important for Uganda’s safaris destination. It would be incomplete to come to Uganda on vacation without doing primate safaris including chimpanzees and endangered mountain Gorillas.

Chimpanzees become popular in the world in 1960 when Jane Goodall observed them making and using basic tools which before her discovery was considered to be the defining characteristics of humans.

Although the chimpanzees are our closest living relatives, the brains have been measured to be around 282-500cc and human brains are approximately three times that size so we are still ahead of them in that field.

Like many other animals, chimpanzees are declining in the wild and are listed as “endangered” by IUCN mainly due to ever-worsening habitat loss. Chimpanzees are so crucial in making safaris wonderful and it about us to make sure that we protect these animal species such that they don’t go into extinction. Uganda has done a lot in conserving the chimpanzees and other wildlife species in protected areas, a reason for their increase.

Chimpanzees in Kyambura gorge live in large communities with strict hierarchies and each one knowing its place. The males and females have separate hierarchical ladders and the top of Alpha male is considered higher than alpha female. Chimpanzee communication is very crucial and sometimes it is in one way similar to communication in humans as it is usually informed of vocalization, hand gestures, and facial expression.

It is prudent to not that chimpanzees being so close with humans, they can as well be infected with viruses and diseases that can attach to human beings as well. Some of the viruses and diseases that can attack these primates include ringworm, Ebola, hepatitis B, and several others. Coronavirus is the latest disease that humans can as well spread to chimpanzees and that why each visitors for chimpanzee trekking in Kyambura gorge now much sanitize and put on a mask to protect the chimpanzees from being affected by the corona virus.

At Kyambura gorge you can experience the thrilling activity of catching up with unruly forest chimpanzees as the gorge comes along with live and noisy calls. Conquering the challenging terrain descending into the steep gorge and crossing the natural log bridges over the rushing river you keep an eye out for the chimpanzees in the canopy above you.

The incredible Kyambura gorge experience is about so much more than just exploring and discovering the chimpanzees and discovering the chimpanzees at home in their natural habitat. Visitors to Kyambura gorge will learn about the ecosystem of Kyambura gorge’s atmospheric “underground forest” including vegetation types, bird species identification, chimpanzees, and monkey ecology.

It is no wonder that the scenic Kyambura gorge was called the lost valley by BBC and the valley Apes by others. A three-hour chimpanzee tracking at Kyambura gorge is not disappointing and thus you need to book a trip to Kyambura gorge for chimpanzee trekking with Africa adventure vacations.

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